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Ruta de las Flores – Waterfalls, coffee and a beast of a food festival in Juayúa

Juayua chicken bus

Juayua chicken bus

It could have been the fried chicken dinner from Pollo Campero.  It could have been the over-consumption of Pilsner.  It may even have been the $1.30 pupusa breakfast on that street corner.  Whatever it was, I was suffering horrendously in the gastric region.  I will leave it at that.  However, we hopped on a bus #210 from Santa Ana bound for Ahuachapán with the intention of changing to bus #264 to take us to Tacuba, where we could explore the El Bosque Imposible national park.  As we left Santa Ana we slowly crawled out of the market, while through the aisle came an endless stream of vendors for 10 minutes straight, selling everything you could ever need from parasite medication, avocadoes, rat poison, gaffa tape, ice cream, socks and not surprisingly, pupusas.  You wouldn’t need to get off the bus to do your weekly shop here!

For the full picture gallery, click here.

We got to Tacuba, a tiny town cobbled street town, sitting 1300m above sea level and found our way to Hostal Mama y Papa, where that have a great mirador looking over the town and the national park, relatively cheap rooms and some aggressive attack ducks.  Unfortunately, I was unwell for two more days, so we decided to move on without doing a hike, but it was a nice place to recuperate in peace.  There really is nothing to do in Tacuba, unless you want to go to the Bosque.

Random Tacuba wall art

Random Tacuba wall art

Streets of Tacuba

Streets of Tacuba

Reflection of the view from the mirador at Mumas and Papas

Reflection of the view from the mirador at Mumas and Papas

Attack duck!

Attack duck!

Packed into a mini chicken bus made for 35 people with approximately 80 other souls we were back to Ahuachapán, where we were soon an a #249 headed down the Ruta de las Flores, which is another of the areas that the country is marketing to tourists.  It’s about a 30km stretch of road lined by wild flowers and framed by some 16 long since extinct volcanoes that now serve as coffee plantations.  The driver ‘tazzed’ past the towns of Ataco and Apaneca bound for our next destination Juayúa, at such a speed I couldn’t tell you if there actually were any wildflowers.  Some locals took pleasure in laughing at Ollie’s facial expressions during the ride, as did I.

One of the extinct volcanoes along the Ruta de las Flores

One of the extinct volcanoes along the Ruta de las Flores

Juayúa is yet another attractive cobbled street town with a handsome white-washed church, peaceful centre square and colourfully painted buildings.  What sets it apart from the rest is the weekly food festival held on Saturdays and Sundays 11am-5pm.  We wandered around until we came to the little haven of Hotel Anahuac where we checked in for 3 nights and booked a waterfall hike for the next day.

The busy streets of Juayua around the white washed church

The busy streets of Juayua around the white washed church

Up at 8am, we follow our local guide called Douglas into the hills with a Canadian couple, and a pack of dogs headed by the guide’s own pooch.  We signed up to hike through the fields and see seven waterfalls along the way.  It was so much more than that.  We approached the edge of what we soon discovered to be a dried up waterfall we could see the first cascade of the day which was streaming out of the rock face in front of us halfway down from underground rivers.  We then walked to another waterfall popular with local tourists where the Canadians took a dip.  I could go on and describe each waterfall in detail.  Let’s just say they were all beautiful and different from each other in remarkable ways.  Douglas disappeared for some time, when he returned we discovered he had tied some ropes so we could rappel down the face of a waterfall into the valley below.  This was unexpected and very challenging in flip-flops, but we all made it down without falling to a watery death.  Here are some pretty pictures of waterfalls now….

Waterfall from underground river appears mid cliff

Waterfall from underground river appears mid cliff

Local lads have a dip in one of the  waterfalls

Local lads have a dip in one of the waterfalls

Hike selfie

Waterfall rainbow

Waterfall rainbow

Waterfall drench

Rappel number one for Ollie

Rappel nummber 2 - My go!

Lunch break

As I have said, the area is a huge producer of coffee.  The conditions of high altitude and volcanic soil are perfect for the industry.  The area is green with coffee trees and an unusual line formation is seen in the lush hills, which are trees planted by the coffee farmers to serve as wind breakers to protect the precious crop.  Hiking through these plantations gave some incredible views of the surrounding country, which seemed to be endlessly green and unspoiled as far as the eye can see.  It was a remarkable hike.

El Salvador...wow

The food festival.  Wow.  We got to the centre square for some serious lunch at 2pm on a Sunday and the place was packed.  Locals and tourists (mainly El Salvadoran) shuffle excitedly past the two streets of food vendors that set up side by side, sniffing the meaty air, tasting tit-bits from touts and looking at what everyone else is eating around them.  Rabbit, Iguana, Frog and even snake are all on offer, but for us hungry traditionalist backpackers we settled on a plate of ribs and a huge chorizo, served with heaps of sides and  a couple of beers for the attractive price of $10 all in.  We then treated ourselves to a couple of crispy fried prawns for dessert.  It was a fine festival, and it happens every week.  Amazing stuff.

Food festival stall - Juayua

Food festival stall – Juayua

Our humble meals!

Our humble meals!

Watching people people watch

Watching people people watch

More food stalls

The center square packs with people who scramble for a place to eat their plates of meat

The center square packs with people who scramble for a place to eat their plates of meat

We decided we liked Juayúa so spent another day, where the owner of Hotel Anahuac, Cesar, took us and another guy on a tour of the local coffee factory where he seemed to have free rein of the place, showing us each stage of the production of my favourite drink and explained the processes in detail. The coffee industry here is huge, as the conditions are perfect for growth.  The higher the better for coffee growth.  The flavour improves the higher you go, and it is grown up to 1800m here.  The highest in the world is in Africa at around some 2300m I am told.  It is not a native crop and was introduced many years ago with the foresight of demand from the US.  It is now shipped worldwide as the photo below will show you.

The lines of the wind breakers to protect the coffee cover most of the scenery around Ruta de las Flores

The lines of the wind breakers to protect the coffee cover most of the scenery around Ruta de las Flores

This ones going to Japan

This ones going to Japan

Good quality coffee is dried by machine and by the sun like this

Good quality coffee is dried by machine and by the sun like this

Truck load of coffee ready for the roast

Truck load of coffee ready for the roast

I’m gonna talk about coffee for a while now so skip ahead a couple of paragraphs if it doesn’t interest you.  Cesar then took us to his own ‘coffee compound’ in town where he hand-dries his beans in the Juayúan sun, then roasts on a small scale for local sale whilst preparing some of his most prized breeds of  coffee plants before they are ready go on the hills.  Cesar roasted some beans in front of us, while explaining the process for the 17 minute duration using a graph to help.  He instructed us on the importance of the timing, as seconds longer could change the acidity, sweetness or the body of the drink that the beans will produce.  There is basically a hell of a lot that can go wrong before the beans of your morning cup of Joe are even ground.  There is also a lot that can go wrong at the next stage…

The roast is a delicate process

The roast is a delicate process

Coffee by Chemix

Coffee by Chemix

I’m a coffee fiend.  Addict is probably more accurate.  I gave up grinding my own beans long ago for lack of success in my technique.  Cesar gave us some excellent tips on how to grind the perfect consistency for the style of coffee you are making.  Of course, he is an excellent Barista as well, and after introducing us to a re-emerging brewing method from 1940’s America called Chemex, he set to work on the machine.  The difference between good espresso and bad espresso is unreal.  I believe I have only been drinking the ‘bad espresso’ by my own untrained hand.  Ollie was treated to the best cappuccino of her life and instructed on how one should sip it in order to get the most out it.  After too many cups of coffee Cesar gave us a pound of coffee, that had been ground to the perfect consistency for use with our trusty coffee sock whilst on the road.  What a dude he is.

Cesars baby coffee trees

Cesars baby coffee trees

We also visited the towns of Ataco and Apaneca that we had passed on the way to Juayúa.  They were pleasant enough in a similar way, both following the trend of cobbled streets, pretty painted houses, white-washed churches near a central square and surrounded by stunning scenery.  Both very pretty, but very quiet towns.

Old fashioned lamposts of Ataco

Old fashioned lamposts of Ataco

Ataco church

Inside the Ataco church

Inside the Ataco church

The distinctive wind breakers and crosses of Apaneca

The distinctive wind breakers and crosses of Apaneca

El Salvador…wow.  That should be the advertising poster for this country.  What have you got in store for us next?

Thanks for reading!

For the full photo gallery, click here!


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Bienvenidos a El Salvador! – Crossing the El Poy border, Suchitoto and Santa Ana

Painting of the Vista de Lago hostel and lake Suchitlan

Painting of the Vista al Lago hostel and lake Suchitlan

Whilst Ollie was spending her time bobbing around with the turtles and the trumpet fish on Roatán, I found myself with quite a lot of spare time.  I decided to plan our trip through El Salvador, including the public transport options.  The buses are all numbered chicken buses and seemed to run on a pretty reliable and cheap network.  So we set off to get a bus from Copán in Honduras to Suchitoto in El Salvador.  As the crow flies, this is not a long way.

For just the full photo gallery, click here.

We started our journey on a 7am and after two cold bus rides through the moody Honduran landscape we found ourselves at the El Poy border.  An uninterested Honduran official stamped us out with not so much as a grunt, we changed some money to US$ (as that is the currency of El Salvador since 2000), wandered through an army of stationary trucks (that we later found out were blocking the borders to vehicle traffic in protest at a new tax) and were then met by a small El Salvadoran official who greeted us warmly and welcomed us to his country.  He showed us the way to the immigration office where we were met with another friendly official who took time to find out where we were going and told us to take off our fleeces as it was warm in his country.  Already, we felt welcome in El Salvador.

Bienvenidos a El Salvador

Bienvenidos a El Salvador

Walking through the peaceful border we hopped on a #119 bus which chugged along for around 2.5 hours through the handsome town of La Palma and some other red tiled roofed communities stashed in the north of this hilly little country.  We were soon off this bus and standing by a strange road in Aguilares, with no sign of the bus I knew we needed.  We asked many people, including the child vendor Ollie nearly gutted with her pack dismounting the last bus, where the next one would stop.  They all told us to wait where we were.  The bus didn’t come so after 40 long minutes and after many hopeful cigarettes smoked (the theory being when you light a cigarette, your bus always comes) we followed another local’s advice who directed us through the heaving market.  Packs getting heavier in the heat of the sun and the desire for a cold beer and a solid recline growing by the minute, the goal seemed out of reach. We finally found the #163 sitting there tucked away one block away, after we had of course done a lap of the market.

Iglesia Santa Lucia over Park Centenario

Iglesia Santa Lucia over Park Centenario

Suchitoto, our first overnight stop, was accessed by a pleasant 50 minute bus ride away from the chaos of Aguilares, west-bound through the peaceful countryside framed by the sun-kissed peaks of long extinct volcanos and hills.  Arriving at about 5:30pm we were greeted by a colourful cobbled street colonial hideaway that overlooks a large manmade reservoir, Lake Suchitlán.  We headed for our desired lodgings, Hostel Vista al Lago, which does indeed have a view of the lake.  They were out of rooms, but the mother of the family-run hostel offered us her emergency room (a cupboard with a bed) for the night until a better option became available.  Arrested by the stunning view of the sun setting over the mountains and the lake we happily agreed and tucked into a few bottles of the local brew called ‘Pilsner’ which tastes fine when ice cold and having done a 11 hour bus epic.

Our first view of Lake Suchitlan, El Salvador

Our first view of Lake Suchitlan, El Salvador

This town, combined with the view from our room that we finally got, was the perfect combination for rest and relaxation.  It’s an easy going place, and feels like it is El Salvador’s push for colonial town tourism.  Except, there were not many foreign sightseers around.  A few pasty Americans, who I assumed were on some kind of church/mission trip, were really the only tourists we saw.

Cobbled streets of Suchitoto

Cobbled streets of Suchitoto

Bright colours of Suchitoto

Bright colours of Suchitoto

We took a walk down to the quaint little tourism port of San Juan one morning, where they have a selection of restaurants, full of El Salvadoran families, and spent the rest of our time in the town just admiring the colours and taking in the tranquility the place seemed to ooze.  A solid local market kept us in bananas and avocados and the town had a few excellent options for coffee so, we were set for three days…which turned into four.  We spent one night out with an Aussie couple, Josh and Anna, who we swapped stories with over pupusas and tinnies in the town square, but the remainder of time was spent outside our room overlooking the captivating lake below us.  We were going to visit a nearby waterfall, but it was the dry season, so it was not…erm, falling.

Puerto San Juan

Puerto San Juan

Lake Suchitlan pose

Lake Suchitlan pose

Lanchas for hire on Lake Suchitlan

Lanchas for hire on Lake Suchitlan

Zip line from main land to island

Zip line from main land to island

Pupusas are our favorite new thing.  They are El Salvador’s way to serve beans and cheese, but instead of using the corn to make tortillas, the pack the ingredients inside the corn dough and then grill it, resulting in a cheesy, beany dough pocket, which you cover with chili sauce and pickled veg.  We were dressing them like a pizza and eating them with cutlery until we observed locals eating with fingers and dipping/scooping their way through meals.  At less than $1 a go, they are a fine backpacker snack.

Not the traditional way to dress a Pupusa, but, it looks pretty

Not the traditional way to dress a Pupusa, but, it looks pretty

The Pupusa lady, she was awesome

The Pupusa lady, she was awesome

This town is beautiful and you can really slow down here.   I would go as far as to say my favorite stop so far on our whole trip. For our first experience in El Salvador, we certainly felt spoiled and had high expectations of the rest of the country.

Quiet colonial charm

Our view at Hostel Vista de Lago.  We got a better one the next day!

Our view at Hostel Vista de Lago. We got a better one the next day!

Anti Domestic violence stencils are outside most houses in Suchitoto

Anti Domestic violence stencils are outside most houses in Suchitoto

Santa Lucia at dusk

Santa Lucia at dusk

The day came to leave and we reluctantly jumped on a bus back to Aguilares, to continue the journey cross country to Santa Ana, El Salvador’s second city.  It’s probably about 40km to the west of Suchitoto and I planned a route across country on three local buses to save time.  Let me just say, I was not completely wrong, but one of the buses only goes once a day, so this journey turned into four buses over six hours.  (If you’re planning this trip, just go to San Salvador and back up, faster and cheaper.)

Santa Ana, El Salvador

Santa Ana, El Salvador

Eventually arriving in Santa Ana we were dropped off in the extreme south of the city, with no cabs in sight so started walking in the rough direction we thought we needed to go, until we were stopped by a local in his car advising us about walking a in a certain direction.  He conceded we had to keep walking that way, but make sure we don’t stop.  A busy local market scene confronted us with everything you can think of on sale, with all of the foul smells and soft underfoot feel to boot.

Casa Verde doesn’t have a sign, it’s just a green house, in a road full of different coloured houses.  We walk into this gringo compound and are confronted by a group of middle aged Europeans in their pants eating watermelon and drinking red wine.  It was a confusing moment to say the least and a bit of a contrast from the grubby streets of Santa Ana.  However, the local owner, Carlos apologised for his lack of rooms (no apology needed!) and showed us to our dorm beds, whilst giving us a tour of his bachelor pad that any lad could only dream of.  Along with the (clean) pool he had two incredible kitchens, free coffee for guests that you had to grind yourself, as well as a wine cellar and cheap frosty beer (it was Pilsner, but hey).  I could go on, but just look at the Trip Advisor.

Street of Santa Ana

Street of Santa Ana

We had some drinks with other guests while the older German lady moaned about the Finnish (we think they were Czech) who were using the kitchens at all times in their pants without the decency to have a nice body.  Up on the roof terrace at night, the city is dead.  No sound at all from the second largest city of El Salvador gives a slightly eerie feeling, yet the endless vista of red tiled roofs under the moonlight with the cathedral poking out above all is a pretty special sight.

The next day, we ventured out to explore the town centre, and after quite possibly the cheapest breakfast ever of five pupusas for $1.30 at the side of one of the city squares (the trade-off being however that you must eat with about 30 El Salvadorans gawping at you throughout the entire meal) we checked out the neo-gothic cathedral as well as the sprawling central market that sells quite literally anything you could need.  The city is hot, possibly too hot for us, so we retreated to the hostel to cool down.

Parque Mendez, Santa Ana.  Great spot for Pupusa breakfast

Parque Mendez, Santa Ana. Great spot for Pupusa breakfast

What, no gun? In the government offices? Outrage!!

What, no gun? In the government offices? Outrage!!

Parque Libertad Santa Ana

Parque Libertad Santa Ana

Inside the Alcaldia, Santa Ana

Inside the Alcaldia, Santa Ana

Catedral Santa Ana

Catedral Santa Ana

Since crossing the border we have been amazed by the friendly nature of the El Salvadoran people.  Of course the children stare at you like you have come from Mars some times, but everyone is incredibly friendly and most will greet you when you catch their eyes, in the places we have been anyway.  Stark contrast from Honduras, our experience crossing the border is a perfect example of the two countries attitudes towards tourism.  Despite being classed officially as one of the world’s top five most murderous countries, we have felt nothing but safe so far.  There is an excellent tourist police visible and willing to help, as well as (so we’re told) one of the most effective and corruption free police force in the Americas.  I just hope this great experience keeps up and so far hasn’t been a fluke.  The El Salvadorans we have met want to help us, even when they have told us the wrong information about buses I get the feeling they are not being devious, they just wanted to assist in any way they can.

Thanks for reading.

For the full photo gallery, click here.


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Lake Yojoa and Copán Ruins – A handsome lake with some top beer, the last of the Mayan ruins and some pretty hard travelling.

Yojoa Canal

An early morning ferry ride took us away from Roatán and back to La Ceiba, where we stayed no longer than required and headed for a local bus to a town called La Guama.  We then changed onto a chicken bus bound for Peña Blanca.  It’s a small market town near Lago de Yojoa, our third stop in Honduras.  It was about a 9 hour journey and certainly not the worst so far.

The bus wasn't this bad...

The bus wasn’t this bad…

To skip straight to the full photo gallery, click here

The journey through the country has given us some incredible views of the unspoilt green vistas that Honduras has to offer.  The bus bounced into this bustling market town along to a reggaeton soundtrack and before we knew it we were at the gates of our humble lodgings for three nights, D&D Brewery. It’s going be tough to talk about the views and not the beer on offer here, but I’ll try.

Green hills of Honduras

Green hills of Honduras

Lago de Yojoa is the largest in Honduras with a surface area of 110 miles and an average depth of 50ft.  It is surrounded by steep green mountains and two National Parks. It is also believed to have around 400 species of bird.

Let me talk about D&D first of all.  The brewery has been there since 2003 (I think?) and has a selection of accommodation from dorm to cabin on offer at pretty good prices.  The food is real tasty and the beer is, well, delightful.  No sooner had we checked in, I found myself with a chilled glass of porter sitting round a fire pit amongst the forest the brewery sits in, with various types of hummingbirds fluttering round my head.  It is certainly a nice spot and a great relief from piss-poor lager since setting foot in Tijuana.

You try and take a photo of a humming bird then!

You try and take a photo of a humming bird then!

Beer and Cat...perfect

Beer and Cat…perfect

There is plenty to do in the area and the brewery is set up to help with guides for both trails and nature.  We didn’t use either and made our own way round the area.  The first day took us to the 43m high Pulhapanzak waterfall where we marveled at the sheer size of it and got pretty wet just looking at it.  The park it sits in is evidently popular with Hondurans, with many swimming in the river above the falls (not too close obviously) and picnics taking place in the green areas surrounding it.  Having a walk around the area and the surrounding hills we are impressed at just how picturesque it all is.  The green hills (that seem to surround everything you look at in the country) at times can seem like a view from the Peak District back in the UK.

Pulhapanzak  Jeep

Looking over the top of Pulhapanzak waterfall

Looking over the top of Pulhapanzak waterfall

Pulhapanzak Watefrall 43m high

Pulhapanzak Watefrall 43m high

Further up stream from Pulhapanzak

Further up stream from Pulhapanzak

Even further upstream

Even further upstream

The second day, we felt we should try and work off some of that beer we indulged in the night before and rented a kayak from the brewery and went out onto the lake.  After spending the first half an hour trying to go a direction other than left, we were out of the canal and onto the lake.  As I have said, the lake is surrounded by a mountainous area, mostly extinct volcanos which, given the size of the lake, can seem to go on endlessly into the distance.  The lake is a great spot for bird watching; of the possibly 400 on offer we saw a big black one, a grey/blue one with big legs, one that looked like a heron and quite a few ducks.  As you can see, we would have benefitted from the bird-watching tour.  There was just no one there apart from a bog snorkeler and a couple of row boat taxis.  It is a great place to spend some time with your thoughts and soak up the scenery.

Kayak on Lake Yojoa

Kayak on Lake Yojoa

Lake Yojoa

Lake Yojoa

After perfecting the art of going forward

After perfecting the art of going forward

sStunning views on the lake

Stunning views on the lake

solid kayaking skills

A pretty amazing three hours spent out on the lake was only beaten when our ride back to the brewery turned up and it was a normal sized mini cab, who proceeded to drive us back with the lion’s share of the  kayak precariously balanced out of the boot.  That night we took full advantage of the beers on offer (well, mainly the porter if I’m honest, the super attentive Walter knew what my usual was and kept ‘em coming) and sat round the fire pit educating a Welsh couple we met on the variety of birds that can be seen on the lake.

Excellent kayak transportation...faultless

Excellent kayak transportation…faultless

It was a hard place to leave.

Our next stop, Copán Ruinas, was 78 miles as the crow flies, but due to our pledge to travel by public bus only from now on (mainly because it’s really cheap) and the lack of connecting roads, this journey took 10 hours, two of which were spent eating poor-quality fried chicken in the delightfully strange place that it San Pedro Sula bus station.  However, the journey cost a total of $18 for the both of us and the dancehall soundtrack on the first chicken bus was certainly entertaining, and offset the worry about the hole in the floor of the aisle.  The weather was poor all the way, as Honduras is having a cold and rainy snap at present.  However, we got to see more impressive scenery, from mountain ranges, lush verdant hills, foggy moor-like areas, and generally more shades of green than I knew existed.  At the same time we rolled through some pretty poor areas.  Attached to every post and board you pass is a flyer for the recent presidential election.  All the candidates offer enormous grins and a generic slogan for some kind of change, but how much change will they bring for the people of these areas?  However, everyone we encountered was friendly enough and we only attracted the occasional stares of curious locals, well Ollie did more than me!

Copan Ruinas town panorama

Copan Ruinas town panorama

Copán Ruinas, is a small cobbled street town with a hint of colonial charm, and is pleasant place to spend a day or two.  The reason for stopping by is to visit the Mayan ruins of Copán, whose construction dates back to around 100AD.  It was the southernmost part of the Maya world, one we have dipped in an out of since southern Mexico.

After a delicious baleada (Honduras’ version of tortilla and beans with other stuff, kind of like a kebab burrito I suppose) we walked the 1km out of the town to the archeological site.  The visitor centre is not even a month old after a renovation project with the Spanish, and as such seems completely alien to the rest of the country.  A short walk into the park and we come across the first collection of ruins.  Some people have said that this site doesn’t compare with other such as Palenque or Tikal, but I disagree.  Although Tikal is impressive in its sheer size, Copán has its well preserved hieroglyphs and various intricate rock carvings that have stood the test of time against the elements.  It’s set in a forested area, framed by the impressive hills I have previously spoken of that quite literally cover the west of Honduras.

Copan Ruins

The macaws that welcomes you to Copan

The macaws that welcomes you to Copan

Base of Temple 16

Base of Temple 16

Copan Skulls

Copan Skulls

West court of Copan Ruins

West court of Copan Ruins

We spent three hours hopping around the site, scaling the large steps and admiring the pre-classic Mayan carvings and stele (carved blocks). There is a particularly handsome hieroglyphic stairway of 72 stone step levels made up of 2200 glyph blocks forming the longest known Mayan hieroglyphic text. We pretty much had the site to ourselves which was surprising seeing as it is the real main draw to the Honduran mainland for tourists.  The second most visited site in the country after the Bay Islands!

Temple 11, overlooking the Plaza central, Copan Ruins

Temple 11, overlooking the Plaza central, Copan Ruins

Pretty impressive scenery all around

Pretty impressive scenery all around

Cemetary Group of Copan Ruins

Cemetary Group of Copan Ruins

Temple 22 Copan Ruins

Temple 22 Copan Ruins

Ollies favorite, the cheeky dancing Jaguar carving

Ollies favorite, the cheeky dancing Jaguar carving

At peace...on top of structure 9

Close up of carvings on the stairway

Close up of carvings on the stairway

Don't Mock the Mayans Rich!

Don’t Mock the Mayans Rich!

A great treat were the red macaws that inhabit the site, some of whom are exhibitionists happy to pose for pics, and others positioning themselves above you in the trees for reasons I’m sure you can guess.

Cheeky Macaws

After the a day at the sight we headed back to Copán town for some refreshment at Twisted Tanya’s in the form of 2-4-1 margaritas followed by a return visit to the Balaeada Inn (one block SW of Parque Central, next to ViaVia) for some more amazing cheap eats, and an early night.

Next stop El Salvador. Honduras seems to have flown by.  I will not miss the random men holding shotguns (“oh, he has some kind of logo on his hat, that’s fine then”). Even the bacon delivery van in this country is accompanied by a chap with a pump-action shotgun in his hand. Apparently it’s because they only do transactions in cash so by the end of his round the delivery man has a few thousand dollars on him and would be too much of a target. Hondurans seem to have little faith in law enforcement so take their own precautions. I also won’t miss the wet and sometimes gloomy weather we have had and the need to continuously back track on ourselves to travel through.  Still, a pretty handsome place!

Thanks for reading!

For the full photo album, click here!